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Top 3 Most “Evil” Women in China’s History

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Since one of the articles we did in the early days of What’s on Weibo about the 10 most evil power women in the history of China has become one of the best-read articles, we decided to feature a vlog on our YouTube channel about this topic.

Although not all of the women in this list are equally “evil” (at all), they’re still much-discussed people on Chinese social media, and have become a part of the canon of Chinese popular culture.

See our latest vlog here:

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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  1. John p

    April 23, 2018 at 6:59 pm

    the most evil women in history are the ones that sleep with a random white man deliberately with the intention to reproduce a half white baby cause they think it will look pretty etc. these women deserve to get an HIV virus.

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China Digital

Top 10 Most Popular Smartphone Brands and Models in China (Summer 2018)

The ten most popular Chinese smartphone brands buzzing on social media.

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There is one topic that is always buzzing on Chinese social media: the latest smartphone trends. This is a top 10 of the most popular Chinese smartphone brands and their hottest models of the moment.

If last year’s major Chinese smartphone trends were all about the big, beautiful & bezel-less screens, this year they are more about nifty features such as turbo-speed for mobile gaming or pop-up cameras.

One major trend that is ongoing and crystal clear is that ‘made in China’ brands are dominating the smartphone and tablet market, with no less than 8 of the top 10 best-sold phones being Chinese brands.

The sales data of Chinese big online shopping festivals offer valuable insights into what brands and models are most appreciated by Chinese consumers. Last month, when e-commerce giant JD.com wrapped up its ‘Black Friday’-like “6.18” anniversary sales event with a record in transactions, Xiaomi and Honor were among the big winning brands in smartphone sales.

Looking at the most-popular smartphone brands and models lists according to Zol.com, leading IT portal website in China, the brands Oppo and Vivo have also continually remained in the top 3 of most popular smartphone brands in China over the previous weeks.

Based on these lists, we’ve compiled the following top 10 of most popular Chinese smartphone brands of the past month.

Note: we have excluded non-Chinese brands Samsung and iPhone from this Chinese brand list; they currently, respectively, hold the no3 and no7 position in expert top 10 most popular smartphones in China lists.

 

#1 Vivo

Vivo is a Chinese domestic brand that has gained worldwide success, first entering the market in 2009. Its headquarters are based in Dongguan, Guangdong. In 2017, Vivo launched its Vivo X20 Plus and VivoX20, the successor of best-seller Vivo X9.

Vivo often cooperates with Chinese celebrities in its marketing campaigns, such as Chinese singer and actor Lu Han (born 1990) or Chinese actress Zhou Dongyu (born 1992), clearly targeting the post-90s consumer group.

Lu Han for Vivo.

Vivo’s current best-seller in China is the Vivo Nex, a futuristic device that is thin but quite big and heavy (6.6-inch FHD+ AMOLED screen, 199 gram – which is just about the same as the Samsung Galaxy Note 8).

The Vivo Nex has a bezel-less screen and a nifty front-facing camera that is tucked away inside the upper frame of the phone and will automatically slide out when the camera is set to front-facing (according to AndroidAuthority, this takes less than a second). It also has a fingerprint sensor that is built into the display.

With the way it is designed, almost the entirety of the front of the phone is a giant 6.59-inch high-definition display.

On Weibo, the Vivo Nex is praised by netizens for offering a “top-notch” mobile gaming experience. People also specifically like the vibrant red edition of the device.

Within China, the phone is currently for sale from 3898 RMB (±US$600). In Europe and the US, unfortunately, the latest Vivo is not for sale just yet.

 

#2 Oppo

Oppo is a Guangdong-based brand officially launched in 2004. It is mainly known for targeting China’s young consumers with its trendy designs and smart marketing. In 2016, the brand was ranked as the number 4 smartphone brand globally.

In targeting young people, Oppo has a special focus on its selfie-making camera; both its front and back cameras are therefore strong.

Previous popular models include the Oppo R11s, which was a top-selling model with its all-screen ‘bezel-less’ display and latest facial recognition technology.

Currently, the hottest Oppo model that is also scoring the highest in top 10 lists is the Oppo Find X. The Find X has a beautiful glass body and a motorized camera – like the Vivo Nex, it also pops up and also functions as a 3D facial scanner for biometric authentication.

The Oppo Find X really has many nifty features (which also seems to be a major trend: the one-phone-has-it-all); the phone’s bezel-less panoramic screen is curved, there’s a dual-camera setup on the back (16MP + 20MP), 25MP front camera, dual SIM slots, etc. Also innovative: the device is available in the cool colors ‘Bordeaux Red’ and ‘Glacier Blue.’

On social media the phone is a hit, but its price is a source of complaints; the phone is available from ±5000 RMB (±US$750). “I could never afford it,” many people say.

 

#3 Honor 荣耀

Honor, established in 2013, is the budget-friendly sister of the Huawei brand. The company’s sub-brand has been doing very well over the past years. Rather than focusing on hyping up its brand name through celebrity campaigns, Honor focuses on great value for money.

Last year, the brand released its Honor V9 and Honor V9 Play models. This year, the Honor Play model (sold from 1999 RMB/US$300 on JD.com) is its most popular model (6.3-inch display).

With this latest model, Honor focuses on China’s booming mobile gaming market, as it comes with a ‘4D’ gaming experience with real-time recognition of the game scene that vibrates the phone to match.

On Weibo, people praise the phone for its speed. The color-loving phone users praise the purple edition of the device, which indeed is pretty fashionable.

 

#4 Huawei 华为

Huawei remains to be one of China’s top smartphone brands. Its 2016 Huawei Mate 9 and 2017 Huawei Mate 10 were top-selling; the current hit phone is the Huawei P20 pro.

The Huawei P20 is especially marketed for its camera functions. On Weibo, Huawei users praise this phone’s nightmode camera which is great to capture darker environments such as concerts or the city by night. Digital Trends even calls it “one of the best cameras ever put in a smartphone.”

The phone has a long-lasting battery and also noteworthy: it comes with one of the coolest color schemes ever inspired by the Northern Lights.

Like the Oppo Find X, this phone also does not come cheap; JD.com sells it from 5488 RMB (±US$827).

 

#5 Xiaomi 小米

Since the launch of its first smartphone in 2011, Beijing-brand Xiaomi has become one of the world’s largest smartphone makers.

The Xiaomi (Mi) brand was initially often called an ‘iPhone copycat,’ but it is now a trendsetting brand in the smartphone business. With its 2016 Mi Mix model, the brand was among the first to ditch thick bezels and go beyond the 16:9 aspect ratio to introduce the ‘all screen’ or ‘bezel-less’ screens, which are all the buzz now. The Mi Mix became one of last year’s hottest smartphones.

The Xiaomi 8 is promoted by Chinese actor Kris Wu as the “cool smartphone.” Not just cool because of how it looks, but also due to its dual frequency GPS tracking. It is priced starting from 2699 RMB (±US$406). (The upcoming Xiaomi Max 3 Pro is also one of the most-anticipated smartphones of this moment.)

 

#6 Meizu 魅族

Meizu is another Chinese homegrown brand, established by high school dropout Jack Wong (黄章) in 2003. Since then, it has grown out to be the 11th best-selling smartphone maker in the world.

The brand recently ranks in the top 10 of best smartphones in China, either on the 6th or 8th place.

The Meizu Pro 7 and the upcoming Meizu 16 are the phones that are currently most promoted by Meizu. The Pro 7 has a small colored screen on its back.

Despite its high ranking, Meizu is less popular among younger people and does not get a lot of attention on Weibo recently.

 

#7 OnePlus 一加

OnePlus is a Shenzhen based Chinese smartphone manufacturer founded by Pete Lau and Carl Pei in December 2013. The company officially serves 32 countries and regions around the world as of January 2018.

The OnePlus 6 is in the top three of most popular phones in China at this moment.

 

#8 LeNovo 联想

Lenovo Group Ltd. or Lenovo PC International, often shortened to Lenovo, is a Chinese multinational technology company with headquarters in Beijing, China and Morrisville, North Carolina.

Outside of China, the brand is more commonly associated with laptops rather than smartphones, but in China, the LeNovo Z5 flagship device currently scores number 8 in the top 10 smartphone lists.

The phone is an attractive device within the more budget-friendly category; it starts at 1299 RMB (±US$195).

 

#9 Qiku 360手机

The Qiku (360手机) brand was founded in 2015 in Shenzhen as a joint effort between Chinese internet giant Qihoo 360 and manufacturer Coolpad.

The N7 model (360手机N7) is their 2018 flagship model and is available from 1699 RMB (±US$256) for the 64GBmodel. ALong with the latest trends, it has a curved glass, fast charging, and long-lasting battery.

 

#10 Smartisan 坚果

Smartisan is a Beijing-based tech company founded in 2012. Its Smartisan R1 flagship model is promoted as “the computer of the future,” and GSMarena even calls this phone “record-breaking” with “top-notch specs and an amount of memory no other device in the market can match” (the most expensive version of ±$1400 comes with 1TB internal memory!)

All in all, when it comes to the latest trends in Chinese smartphones, it is all about the more advanced functions.

For those going for GPS tech, there’s Xiaomi, for camera lovers, there’s Huawei’s latest, for gaming fans, there’s Honor, for data-heavy users, Smartisan’s a (pricey) option, but for people loving overall innovative design, Vivo and Oppo are the winners this summer.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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Backgrounder

The Power of Peppa Pig: The Cultural Icon of China’s ‘Shehuiren’ Punks

From children’s icon to ganger pig, Peppa Pig is now banned from China’s popular short video platform Douyin.

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From innocent children’s cartoon via subculture icon to banned topic; Peppa Pig has had a rollercoaster ride in China recently, and her own Peppa Theme Park has not even opened its doors in the PRC yet.

Over the past weekend, Chinese popular short video app Douyin (also known in English as Tik Tok) removed approximately 30,000 short videos relating to British cartoon Peppa Pig from its platform.

Douyin’s “Peppa Ban” became a hot topic of debate on Chinese social media today, with the hashtag ‘Douyin Blocks Peppa Pig” (#抖音封杀小猪佩奇#) receiving over 40 million views on Tuesday.

According to a list of Douyin’s guidelines that have been surfacing online, Peppa is just one amongst various topics and themes banned from the platform. Other types of banned content include those relating to smoking, drinking, cross-dressing, cults or religion, and anything insulting the Chinese government.

Over the past few months, Peppa Pig has become a subversive symbol to a Chinese online youth subculture dubbed ‘shehuiren‘ (社会人), literally ‘society people’, which is a group of young adults that is anti-establishment and somewhat ‘punk’ in their own way; going against mainstream values and, as state media outlet Global Times puts it, are “the antithesis of the young generation the Party tries to cultivate.”

Shehuiren Subculture and Peppa

Now that the Peppa ban on Douyin is receiving ample attention on Chinese social media, so is the shehuiren subculture, with many people wondering what this subculture is and why Peppa Pig, a British children’s cartoon, plays a part in it.

On various Chinese message boards, from Baidu Tieba to Zhihu, netizens are discussing the ‘society people’ – meaning not literally the people in society but the specific group of ‘shehuiren’ that mainly emerged from Chinese short video platforms such as Kuaishou and Douyin.

Their name derives from a meme and online slogan of “society, society” (社会社会) which basically means someone’s been around the ‘hood’, is cool, are doing their business, know the right people, is a ‘boss’ or ‘gangsta’.

‘Shehui shehui!’ – this bad boy is straight from ‘the hood’.

These are some of their general characteristics:

  • They are usually born after 1995 (95后), aged between 17-23.
  • They belong to the lower class of society, have a low education and work temporary jobs.
  • They are active on online video platforms such as Kuaishou or Douyin and want to become internet celebrities like MC天佑 (MC Tianyou), a well-known Chinese live-streamer/rapper.
  • They are part of social circles run by a ‘big brother’ (大哥); they often hang around smoking cigarettes and playing cards.
  • With their hair gel and skin-tight shirts, their appearance is quite outspoken.
  • The shehuiren term generally refers to young men, but there are also girls and/or girlfriends, who have bleached hair and wear short skirts.

“Shehuiren”: the “punks” or “greasers” of 2018 China.

Earlier in March and April, some Chinese blogs and media (e.g. anruan.com, Sohu News) already reported on the fact that Peppa Pig had become an icon for these online youth, two years after the British cartoon entered the Chinese market in 2015.

Although you would expect golden chains and dangerous-looking tattoos on the shehuiren, the supermarket Peppa Pig plastic watches became a hit in March when live-streamers started buying and wearing them.

Peppa Pig was already known in the circles of parents and teachers before, but first really became known among Chinese netizens when a live-streamer on the Kuaishou app showed off a Peppa Pig tattoo.

This livestreamer was actually not the first one with a Peppa Pig tattoo – in 2013, Italian footballer Alberto Giraldino also showed off a Peppa on his upper arm.

After the Kuaishou video and image with the Peppa tattoo became popular, it gradually become more adopted within the shehuiren community on other platforms such as Douyin and WeChat moments.

“Interesting Ordinary People”

As pointed out by one Baidu blogger, fervent users of the top short video apps Douyin and Kuaishou generally mostly like to see “interesting ordinary people.”

Since most of them are young, generally under 24, and are not part of society in terms of having a family, being married, or having a stable job, they are looking for ways to identify themselves: tattoos and big watches being major topics of discussion.

But since they are not actually gangsters, nor want to be really ordinary people, they have found in Peppa what they were looking for: by wearing Peppa watches and fake tattoos, they are mocking the big tattoos and Golden Rolex watches of the real tough guys, while also distinguishing themselves from mainstream culture and fashion.

The irony of the trend is that by ridiculing themselves through the use of the silly Peppa Pig, with her uncool and hairdryer-shaped head, they are now finally what they wanted to be all along: a pretty cool subculture, with a pretty gangster pig as an icon that has set a nationwide trend; according to Sixth Tone, more than 100,000 plastic watches and bracelets with various Peppa Pig designs were sold on Taobao in the last month.

The Peppa Ban on Douyin

With so much interest in Peppa Pig over the past month, it is no surprise that the recent ban on the piglet triggered waves of discussions on social media platforms such as Weibo, where Peppa has become a much-shared meme in all sort of varieties, with all kind of texts – often associated with dark humour.

Some people, however, say they have no idea what all the fuss is about and that it makes them feel old: “I was born in 1990 and I’ve never used Douyin and don’t understand why Peppa Pig is so popular!”

Many commenters also said they do not understand why Peppa would be banned at all, if it has nothing to do with copyright issues. Douyin has not responded to the issue.

Douyin is a sister app of news platform Toutiao (owned by Bytedance), which was recently criticized by authorities for hosting inappropriate content. The company then vowed to hire 4,000 additional censors. Its recent new guidelines may be a sign that the company is not taking any risks in getting more warnings from authorities in hyping up subcultures or “vulgar content.”

Despite the Douyin ban, hashtags relating to the pig have not been censored on Weibo, and if all goes as planned, Peppa will have her own theme parks in China opened in 2019 in Beijing and Shanghai, just before the Year of the Pig.

“I don’t know what all this shehui is,” another commenter said: “I just think Peppa is a cute pig.”

Watch the What’s on Weibo segment on BBC World Update on this issue here:

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.


Directly support Manya Koetse. By supporting this author you make future articles possible and help the maintenance and independence of this site. Donate directly through Paypal here. Also check out the What’s on Weibo donations page for donations through creditcard & WeChat and for more information.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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What’s on Weibo provides social, cultural & historical insights into an ever-changing China. What’s on Weibo sheds light on China’s digital media landscape and brings the story behind the hashtag. This independent news site is managed by sinologist Manya Koetse. Contact info@whatsonweibo.com. ©2014-2018

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