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Billionaire Bachelor Wang Sicong’s Desperate Unrequited Love Drama Exposed Online

Wang Sicong is one of China’s wealthiest and most eligible bachelors, but this love interest wasn’t interested at all. She has now shared their erratic chat conversations with the public.

Manya Koetse

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Chinese netizens are grabbing their popcorn (or sunflower seeds) and are diving into this explosive story as these leaked WeChat records show that the extremely rich & famous bachelor Wang Sicong is no Prince Charming after all.

Wang Sicong (王思聪), the son of one of the richest men in China, has become the most popular gossip topic on Weibo this week after his love interest leaked their WeChat conversation records online.

Wang Sicong, who has over 41 million followers on his Weibo account (@王思聪), is one of China’s most famous fu’erdai (富二代, the ‘second generation rich’). Wang is the son of Chinese tycoon Wang Jianlin (王健林), one of the richest persons in Asia.

Wang Sicong is a 33-year-old businessman, and he is known as a playboy who has had many girlfriends but never settled down, turning him into one of China’s most wealthy eligible bachelors. But despite so many women being interested in Wang, the girl he has been chasing for the past few years, internet celebrity and livestreamer Sun Yining (孙一宁), is just not into him at all.

Sun and Wang first met four years ago, and apparently, Wang never stopped pursuing her ever since. In the screenshots of the WeChat conversations between the two that leaked online, Wang is very blunt in expressing his interest in Sun and doesn’t shy away from using cheesy pick-up lines and repeating how much he misses her.

At times, he is rude and pushy, telling Sun he needs to see her: “Can’t you just make me feel better? My mood has been bad for days.” He sometimes also keeps sending Sun belligerent messages, even if she does not respond at all.

Wang keeps talking to Sun (in a patronizing way), even if Sun doesn’t respond at all.

Sun, however, again and again, keeps shutting him down by changing the topic, ignoring his cringy phrases, or making fun of him.

At one point during the four-year-long ‘charm offensive,’ Sun tells Wang that she is attracted to women and not to men – but even that doesn’t stop his ‘alpha male strategy’ to win her over: “Will you still say you’re a lesbian when you’re lying in my arms?”

Sun asks Wang if he realises how ridiculous he is after the ‘lesbian’ comment.

The conversations between the two become even more bizarre in April of 2021 when Wang unexpectedly tells Sun he has come to her hometown of Hangzhou to spend time with her, and then gets angry when she is not happy to meet him. He insists that they meet, even when Sun clearly indicates she has no interest in him.

Even after that, the billionaire keeps sending Sun desperate messages on how much he misses her and how he cannot believe that she is not a heterosexual woman. In the end, the conversation between the two gets so explosive that Wang threatens to expose Sun. But the tables were turned, and Sun was the one to first post the history of their WeChat messages online on June 15.

On her Weibo account, where the live-streaming star has over 720,000 fans, Sun shares how she has always been straightforward with Wang Sicong that she was not interested in becoming his girlfriend. She also makes it clear that Wang’s money and influence will not stop her from taking control over her own life.

Before posting the chat history, Sun appeared to be drunk and upset while live-streaming at night and scolding Wang Sicong.

On Weibo, the hashtag “Sun Yining / Wang Sicong” (#孙一宁 王思聪#) has received over 550 million views by now.

The drama further snowballed on Tuesday when Wang himself apparently also shared their WeChat chat records online, claiming Sun Yining had been misleading about their relationship and is not to be trusted. That hashtag page (#王思聪曝光和孙一宁聊天记录#) also attracted over 500 million views.

Many of the thousands of people commenting on this story find it entertaining and funny; who would have thought that the richest son in the country would be so poor when it comes to love? Others expressed disbelief that such a powerful man would be begging for this girl’s love for so many years.

There are those praising Sun Yining: “This offers new perspectives for online influencers. Rejecting Wang Sicong turns out to make you hotter than becoming Wang Sicong’s girlfriend!” But many people also do not sympathize with Sun at all, calling her a drama queen and an actress.

Even in the middle of the night, the Weibo discussions on ‘Wang versus Sun’ continue on Weibo. “I’m here enjoying this spectacle,” one commenter says: “I can’t wait to see what happens next.”

 

By Manya Koetse with contributions by Miranda Barnes

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2021 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Manya Koetse is the founder and editor-in-chief of whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer, public speaker, and researcher (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends, digital developments, and new media in an ever-changing China, with a focus on Chinese society, pop culture, and gender issues. She shares her love for hotpot on hotpotambassador.com. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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China Celebs

“A Good Day” – Kris Wu Sentenced to 13 Years in Prison

The first woman who came forward to accuse Kris Wu in 2021 celebrated his sentencing in a livestream.

Manya Koetse

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The Chinese-Canadian fallen celebrity Kris Wu, better known as Wu Yifan (吴亦凡) in China, has been dominating Chinese social media discussions after a preliminary court ruling came out in the criminal case in which Wu was accused of rape and other sex crimes.

On November 25, the Beijing Chaoyang district court found Wu guilty of raping three women in his home in 2020 and of “gathering people to commit adultery.” He was sentenced to 13 years in prison followed by deportation.

Kris Wu is a 32-year old rapper, singer, and actor who was born in Guangzhou and moved to Vancouver with his mother at the age of ten. Wu also spent a part of his high school years in Guangzhou, but he holds a Canadian passport. He became famous as a member of the K-pop band Exo and later started a solo career.

As an actor, he starred in several award-winning movies. He also starred in Sweet Sixteen, a movie in which Wu ironically plays the role of someone getting jailed for shooting a rapist.

The 19-year-old student Du Meizhu (都美竹) was the first to accuse Wu of predatory behavior online in 2021, with at least 24 more women also coming forward claiming the celebrity showed inappropriate behavior and had pressured young women into sexual relationships. As the scandal unfolded, various hashtags related to the story received billions of views on Weibo. Wu was formally arrested on suspicion of rape in mid-August 2021.

On Friday, Meizhu posted “Finally [I’ve waited for this]” on her social media account. She also briefly joined a livestream in which she celebrated the sentencing and played the song “A Good Day” (“好日子”).

On Weibo, the hashtag “Wu Yifan Gets 13 Years” [13 years prison sentence in preliminary ruling] (#吴亦凡一审被判13年#) received nearly 1,8 billion views on Friday.

Noteworthy enough, the Kris Wu hashtag was also being used by netizens to discuss the tragic Urumqi fire which was also a major trending topic on the same day.

Some speculated that the media attention for the Kris Wu case was being used to overshadow the Urumqi news. Others condemned social media users for turning to celebrity news instead of focusing on the tragic fire in Xinjiang’s capital.

At the same time, there was also a running joke on social media in light of China’s ongoing ‘zero Covid’ policy, with people saying: “Who will come out first, Kris Wu or us?”

By Manya Koetse 

Featured image: Kris Wu starring in Sweet Sixteen movie.

 

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China Brands & Marketing

About Lipstick King’s Comeback and His ‘Mysterious’ Disappearance

After Li Jiaqi’s return to livestreaming, the ‘tank cake incident’ has become the elephant in the room on social media.

Manya Koetse

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Earlier this week, the return of China’s famous livestreamer Li Jiaqi, also known as the ‘Lipstick King’, became a hot topic on Chinese social media where his three-month ‘disappearance’ from the social commerce scene triggered online discussions.

He is known as Austin Li, Lipstick King, or Lipstick Brother, but most of all he is known as one of China’s most successful e-commerce livestreaming hosts.

After being offline for over 100 days, Li Jiaqi (李佳琦) finally came back and did a livestreaming session on September 20th, attracting over 60 million viewers and selling over $17 million in products.

The 30-year-old beauty influencer, a former L’Oreal beauty consultant, rose to fame in 2017 after he became a successful livestreamer focusing on lipstick and other beauty products.

Li broke several records during his live streaming career. In 2018, he broke the Guinness World Record for “the most lipstick applications in 30 seconds.” He once sold 15000 lipsticks in 5 minutes, and also managed to apply 380 different lipsticks in another seven-hour live stream session. Li made international headlines in 2021 when he sold $1.9 billion in goods during a 12-hour-long promotion livestream for Alibaba’s shopping festival.

But during a Taobao livestream on June 3rd of this year, something peculiar happened. After Li Jiaqi and his co-host introduced an interestingly shaped chocolate cake – which seemed to resemble a tank, – a male assistant in the back mentioned something about the sound of shooting coming from a tank (“坦克突突”).

Although Li Jiaqi and the others laughed about the comment, Li also seemed a bit unsure and the woman next to him then said: “Stay tuned for 23:00 to see if Li Jiaqi and I will still be in this position.”

The session then suddenly stopped, and at 23:38 that night Li wrote on Weibo that the channel was experiencing some “technical problems.”

But those “technical problems” lasted, and Li did not come back. His June 3rd post about the technical problems would be the last one on his Weibo account for the months to come.

The ‘cake tank incident’ (坦克蛋糕事件) occurred on the night before June 4, the 33rd anniversary of the violent crackdown of the Tiananmen student demonstrations. The iconic image of the so-called ‘tank man‘ blocking the tanks at Tiananmen has become world famous and is censored on China’s internet. The control of information flows is especially strict before and on June 4, making Li’s ‘tank cake incident’ all the more controversial.

But no official media nor the official Li Jiaqi accounts acknowledged the tank cake incident, and his absence remained unexplained. Meanwhile, there was a silent acknowledgment among netizens that the reason Li was not coming online anymore was related to the ‘tank cake incident.’

During Li’s long hiatus, fans flocked to his Weibo page where they left thousands of messages.

“I’m afraid people have been plotting against you,” many commenters wrote, suggesting that the cake was deliberately introduced by someone else during the livestream as a way to commemorate June 4.

Many fans also expressed their appreciation of Li, saying how watching his streams helped them cope with depression or cheered them up during hard times. “What would we do without you?” some wrote. Even after 80 days without Li Jiaqi’s livestreams, people still commented: “I am waiting for you every day.”

On September 21st, Li Jiaqi finally – and somewhat quietly – returned and some people said they were moved to see their lipstick hero return to the livestream scene.

Although many were overjoyed with Li’s return, it also triggered more conversations on why he had disappeared and what happened to him during the 3+ months of absence. “He talked about a sensitive topic,” one commenter said when a Weibo user asked about Li’s disappearance.

One self-media accountpublished a video titled “Li Jiaqi has returned.” The voiceover repeatedly asks why Li would have disappeared and even speculates about what might have caused it, without once mentioning the tank cake.

“This cracks me up,” one commenter wrote: “On the outside we all know what’s going on, on the inside there’s no information whatsoever.”

“It’s tacit mutual understanding,” some wrote. “It’s the elephant in the room,” others said.

Some people, however, did not care about discussing Li’s disappearance at all anymore and just expressed joy about seeing him again: “It’s like seeing a good friend after being apart for a long time.”

By Manya Koetse 

Elements in the featured image by @karishea and @kaffeebart.

 

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