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Violent Attack on 7-Year-Old on Sichuan Bus Triggers Discussions on Chinese “Little Brats”

A shocking attack on a naughty boy on a public bus have triggered online discussions on China’s “little brats.”

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Shocking footage of an adult man violently attacking a little boy on a public bus in Sichuan province is making headlines in China this weekend.

The incident occurred in the city of Suining on the morning of April 27, Toutiao News (头条新闻) reports.

Security cameras on the bus captured how a little boy teasingly kicks a male passenger three times, hanging around the bus, seemingly bored.

After the third kick, the man suddenly jumps up and grabs the child by the back and violently slams him on the floor. He then proceeds to brutally kick the child’s head a total of three times.

The video of the incident can be viewed here, but viewer’s discretion is advised – the footage shows very graphic violence.

At least four other eight other adult passengers and one child witnessed the incident.

One woman, standing near, stops the man and picks the motionless child from the floor. The child slowly seems to gain some consciousness but then collapses on the floor again, when two other passengers rush forward and warn the bus driver.

Police quickly arrived at the scene. The attacker has since been detained for 15 days.

According to reports, the boy is a 7-year-old local student who was on the way from school to home, taking the bus by himself. He was not acquainted with the adult man.

Miraculously, besides some bruises on the face, the boy did not suffer any serious internal or external injuries from the violent attack.

The news and the shocking footage have become a big topic of discussion on Chinese social media, with people roughly taking three different stances on the story.

One group of people says they are disgusted with the aggressive man. “How can someone be so malicious?”, they ask.

But there are also many people who say that they have had enough with “little brats” such as this boy.

“It’s good that he received a beating, these kinds of spoiled brats need to be punched,” they say: “If your parents won’t teach you, society will.”

“I don’t support the man who beat the child, but I also do not pity the kid,” another popular comment said.

A third group of commenters say it is the parents who are to blame for this incident because they let their child travel alone, and because they did not teach him properly not to disturb other people.

“Why does this child take the bus alone? Why is he not accompanied by his parents?”, a typical comment said: “The child’s guardians are partly to be blamed for this.”

“They should be the ones to be detained in prison for 15 days,” someone else wrote.

“If you do not properly teach your child, then the world will teach him,” another commenter wrote.

Last week, another story went trending on Chinese social media that involved a pregnant woman deliberately tripping a 4-year-old boy in a Baoji restaurant because he had slammed a plastic door windbreaker in her face.

The behaviour of China’s so-called “little brats” often makes headlines, such as when a young boy recently urinated in an elevator and broke it, or when a little kid crashed and destroyed a Lego sculpture within an hour after it was displayed in a Chinese mall.

These young boys are also commonly dubbed “Little Emperors” – as their parents only sons, they are often so spoilt, pampered, and protected, that they show amoral and self-absorbed behavior.

Many commenters on social media say that they have had enough with these “little brats”, who make their “hair stand on end with anger,” and note that in this particular case, it was the child’s bad behavior that triggered the outburst.

But for some people, the discussions about the little boy’s behavior are out of proportion. As one commenter writes: “I see all these comments on Weibo, and they are all about how this kid’s a little brat – and he sure is -, but the man is the one who is dreadful! This kind of sudden explosion of violence is awful, he could beat someone to death.”

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Manya Koetse is the founder and editor-in-chief of whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer, public speaker, and researcher (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends, digital developments, and new media in an ever-changing China, with a focus on Chinese society, pop culture, and gender issues. She shares her love for hotpot on hotpotambassador.com. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. winona

    May 13, 2018 at 10:23 pm

    jesus christ. another child witnessed that. what a scary situation to be in!! all those witnesses would have been scarred. that woman who stepped in is so brave!! i would have frozen in fear. that man has violence issues. jesus christ.

    • Eugene

      September 27, 2018 at 2:59 am

      What kind of parent lets a child take a bus unaccompanied? I don’t condone the man’s actions but a lot worse could have happened to this kid. It could have been some sicko pedophile he was kicking and in that moment he decides to ‘adopt him’. And we never see the kid again. This is as much on the parents neglect as it is this guy’s overreactions.

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China and Covid19

‘Hard Isolation’ is Shanghai’s New Word of the Day

In line with a new ‘hard isolation’ measure, the entrances of some Shanghai residential buildings were fenced up.

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While some Shanghai households have already endured weeks of isolation, a new word was added to their epidemic vocabulary today: ‘hard isolation’ or ‘strong quarantine’ (yìng gélí 硬隔离)

The word popped up on Chinese social media on April 23rd after some Shanghai netizens posted photos of fences being set up around their community building to keep residents from walking out.

“New word: hard isolation. Shanghai is rotten to the core,” one commenter wrote.

The word soon turned into a hashtag page where people started commenting on the issue of fences being placed around residential buildings, voicing concerns on what a fence around buildings would mean for fire safety, especially after online rumors suggested that there had been a fire at one community in Pudong on Saturday night.

An official document regarding the ‘hard isolation’ measure was also shared online on Saturday. It is dated April 23, 2022, and its source is the Pudong New Area Office for Epidemic Control.

The document states that in line with the guidelines for the city’s epidemic prevention and control, the division between areas or zones that are in certain risk categories should be ‘optimized,’ with those in the high-risk category requiring a ‘hard isolation.’ Security guards should also be on duty 24 hours a day at the entrance of the buildings.

Earlier this month, Shanghai adopted “3-level control measures” after its initial phased lockdown. It means that local areas will be classified as “locked-down,” “controlled” or “precautionary,” based on their Covid19 risk.

“Could we also put fences around the homes of Shanghai leaders?”, one person suggested, while others posted images from the Walking Dead to mock the situation.

In the hope of Shanghai soon tackling the Covid situation, not everybody disagreed with the decision to fence some buildings or communities in the Pudong area: “I don’t disagree with it, as long as there is always someone there to open the fence in case of fire,” one person stated.

Although having a fence around their building is currently not a reality for most in Shanghai, the online photos of some communities seeing their buildings being fenced up is a reason to worry for some: “It’s been 40 days, and now they start hard isolation? This actually scares me. Before we know it, it’s June.”

One Weibo user asked: “Why is it possible to implement this hard isolation now? Was this created by the same persons who also implemented the rule to separate children from parents at isolation sites?”

“I truly can’t imagine why some people thought this is a good idea,” others wrote.

For more articles on the Covid-19 topics on Chinese social media, check here.

By Manya Koetse

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©2022 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China and Covid19

‘Voices of April’: The Day After

“The best way to make videos go viral is by censoring them.”

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On April 23, a day after the video ‘Voices of April’ briefly took over social media before it was censored, the trending topic of the day is a hashtag related to new Covid cases reported in Shanghai.

Shanghai reported higher Covid-19 cases and deaths on Friday than the five days prior, which showed a daily decline in new cases. Shanghai reported a total of 23,370 new cases (including 20,634 asymptomatic ones), the municipal health commission said Saturday. A related hashtag by Xinhua News received over 910 million views on Weibo on Saturday (#上海新增本土确诊2736例无症状20634例#).

Although the hashtag was initiated by state media to inform about the Shanghai Covid situation, netizens started using it to criticize Shanghai’s handling of the crisis, with more commenters questioning China’s zero-Covid strategy. Similarly, other state media-initiated hashtag places also became online spaces where Weibo users vented their frustrations earlier this month.

Besides the ongoing online criticism and vocal disagreement with China’s Covid handling and policies, there are also many who express shock at the recent crackdown of any form of protest or criticism regarding the situation in Shanghai.

“‘Voices of April’ has been shutdown all over the internet, I’m simply dumbfounded,” one person said about the popular video that contained real recordings of events that happened during the city’s lockdown.

“If you still can find the video anywhere, forward it,” another person writes.

Besides Voices of April (四月之声), there have also been other videos over the past week that are meant to expose the mishandling of the Covid situation in Shanghai.

One of them is titled Farewell, Language (再见语言), another one is Shanghai Late Spring (上海晚春).

Farewell, Language (再见语言) is a 42-second sound art video by artist Yang Xiao (杨潇), who used over 600 commonly used propaganda phrases from Chinese official channels and randomly broadcasted the audio in the community where he lives.

The anti-epidemic workers just continue their work and do not seem to notice anything out of the ordinary at all. The video shows how this kind of language has been so normalized that for most, it has just become background noise in their everyday life – without even noticing nor critically assessing its meaning or logic anymore.

The Shanghai Late Spring (上海晚春) video is a compilation of video footage from the Shanghai lockdown, showing people struggling to get food, violent altercations between anti-epidemic workers and residents, people living in deplorable conditions in quarantine centers, and more (link to video).

The video uses the song Cheer Up London by Slaves, its chorus being:

You’re dead, already, dead, dead, already-ready
Dead, already, dead, dead, already-ready
Dead, already, dead, dead, already-ready
Dead, already, dead
.”

One Weibo commenter responded to the video in English, using a text from Les Misérables: “Do you hear the people sing / Singing the song of angry men / It is the music of a people / Who will not be slaves again!” The phrase “do you hear the people sing” was also used by other social media users to address the situation in Shanghai and the censorship of related topics.

“The best way to make videos go viral is by censoring them,” one commenter replied.

Read our previous article about ‘Voices of April’ here.

For more articles on the Covid-19 topics on Chinese social media, check here.

By Manya Koetse, with contributions by Miranda Barnes

Get the story behind the hashtag. Subscribe to What’s on Weibo here to receive our weekly newsletter and get access to our latest articles:

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2022 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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