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Why Chinese Filmgoers Won’t Be Seeing Christopher Robin (BBC World Update)

Chinese filmgoers won’t be seeing Christopher Robin – What’s on Weibo talking to BBC World Update.

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Disney’s latest film Christopher Robin will not be released in Chinese cinemas. Many English-language media claim it is for the fact that the movie’s main star, Winnie the Pooh, is regarded too politically sensitive in the country. But these reports are clouded by misconceptions: Winnie is not banned in China, and it is common for Western films not to be released in the PRC.

What’s on Weibo editor-in-chief Manya Koetse speaks to Paul Henley at BBC World Update (see video by What’s on Weibo here):

For more on this topic, read our latest feature here.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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China Insight

Tears, Outrage, Protest, and Censorship over ‘Fake Major’ at Nanjing School

No diploma, no credentials: they were supposed to graduate, but are now left empty-handed as it turns out their Nanjing college was never qualified to teach them.

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Students who studied Nursing at the “Nanjing Institute of Applied Technology” for the past three years are unable to get a certificate or degree, as it now turns out they have actually been doing a fake Major. The news has led to outrage and despair among students, parents, and netizens. Local police cracked down on student protests at the campus this weekend.

Over the past few days, the Nanjing Institute of Applied Technology (南京应用技术学校) has been at the center of a major controversy that has been dominating discussions on Chinese media and on social media.

Students who registered for the school’s Nursing Program, and who were about to graduate after three years of studying, were shocked to discover that their school was not qualified to offer their program and that there were issues with their registration. Chinese media describe the school’s program as a ‘fake Major’ (假专业).

Although the students completed required Nursing courses, including internal medicine, pediatrics, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, they are now unable to get the proper credentials to do an internship or to be employed in the medical field, since they are not officially qualified.

News of the scandal first came out through students who said their teachers informed them on April 22nd that they would need to transfer to another vocational school in order to receive proper credentials.

According to Chinese news outlet The Observer, the situation applies to all students of the school who started their studies there in 2016 and after.

The Nanjing school was reportedly established in 2003 and received approval of the relevant departments to operate as a full-time vocational school. The school is privately-run but supervised by the Nanjing Municipal Human Resources and Social Security Bureau. There are currently over 6000 students enrolled in the school, according to its official website.

Students enrolled in the ‘fake’ Nursing program paid an annual tuition fee of 16000 yuan ($2377).

Over the past weekend, conflicts erupted at the school campus. Footage and photos flooding WeChat and Weibo show dozens of students clashing with security staff, and police cracking down on protests. At least one female student was allegedly beaten by a security guard.

Official media reported that some people who had previously been expelled from the school had used the situation at hand to return to the school to ‘stir up trouble.’

Multiple hashtag pages, posts, and videos relating to the incident were removed from social media site Weibo.

The Nanjing Municipal Human Resources and Social Security Bureau responded to the issue of the ‘fake school’ on Monday, April 29, stating that besides the Nanjing Institute of Applied Technology, there are two other schools involved in this matter: the Nanjing Oriental Arts & Science College (南京东方文理专修学院) and the Yingtian Vocational and Technical College (应天职业技术学院), which are both private colleges that have also been approved by the Jiangsu Provincial Department of Education.

In an online statement, the Bureau explains that the Nanjing Institute of Applied Technology started working together with the Nanjing Oriental Arts & Science College (南京东方文理专修学院) in 2015 in running a school without reporting it to the relevant departments for approval.

The Bureau further states that it is “actively searching for a solution” in this matter, and that “maintaining order” at the school is one of its priorities.

“This school is such sh*t, I really feel so grieved for these students,” one among thousands of comments on Weibo said.

Although many threads focused on this issue are currently being censored on Chinese social media, Phoenix News is one of the media outlets that is still reporting on the issue, receiving much support from online commenters.

For now, the students and their parents are still left empty-handed.

“You damaged people’s rights and broke the rules,” angry commenters write on Weibo. “We can’t let students be harmed this way. Now it’s them, next time it’s your own kid. We cannot remain silent.”

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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China Digital

Digitalizing China’s Beauty Industry: Introducing Supermakeup’s ‘Beauty Charging Stations’

Are ‘makeup charging stations’ the next trend in China’s beauty industry?

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You’re on the road and need a skin, make-up, or hair fix-up before your next appointment, but have no time for a spa session and would rather avoid dirty toilet rooms? These are the kinds of situations that Beijing’s Supermakeup company has claimed to have found the solution for.

With its ‘beauty charging stations’ in public urban spaces, the Supermakeup company is trying to launch a new kind of beauty industry where women can use their self-service ‘spa booths’ and make-up product stores in the middle of a street or shopping mall.

Access to the booths is provided through the Supermakeup app or via its WeChat programme, and payment of products and access is done via WeChat Pay.

The Supermakeup Company (北京超级美科技有限公司) was established in March of 2018 and is headquartered in Beijing.

Will this be the big next trend that will further digitalize China’s beauty industry? We tried it out for you, check out our latest video below.

By Manya Koetse 

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please email us.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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What’s on Weibo provides social, cultural & historical insights into an ever-changing China. What’s on Weibo sheds light on China’s digital media landscape and brings the story behind the hashtag. This independent news site is managed by sinologist Manya Koetse. Contact info@whatsonweibo.com. ©2014-2018

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