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Another Kindergarten Abuse Case: Beijing’s RYB Education Branch Accused of Drugging and Molesting Children

Parents are accusing RYB Education of drugging and abusing their children. Details surrounding the case are being censored in Chinese media and on Weibo.

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After the Ctrip kindergarten scandal, another major kindergarten abuse case is the talk of the day on Chinese social media. Employees of Beijing RYB Education are suspected of drugging and molesting young children.

Another kindergarten child abuse case has sparked indignation on social media in China this week. After the Shanghai wasabi case, it now concerns the Honghuanglan (红黄蓝) kindergarten in Beijing’s Chaoyang district (Xintiandi branch).

The kindergarten, also known as the ‘Red Yellow Blue (RYB) Education’ is a large chain of preschools (2-6 year olds) with hundreds of branches across mainland China. According to China Daily, it operates 80 kindergartens directly and has 175 franchises in 130 cities and towns.

The ‘Red Yellow Blue’ kindergarten (photo by Sina).

On November 22, the story became trending on Weibo and WeChat when netizens exposed how more than a dozen parents filed a report at the Chaoyang police station against their children’s kindergarten.

The parents claim their children were fed unclear white pills and had been injected, providing many photos showing needle punctures in their children’s skin in areas on their legs, arms, and buttocks. They suspect that their children have been drugged and molested.

The case began when several parents noticed irregular behavior in their children and then discovered the punctures in their skin. Some parents claim they also found indications of sexual abuse on their child’s body. Some children refused to go to school, others pointed out where they had suffered needle pricks.

Parents shared photos showing punctures in their children’s skin.

Several videos recorded by the parents involved made their ways to parental support groups. One video shows two parents asking their toddler son about a white pill they discovered on him. The little boy then answers “the teacher gave it to me to make me sleep.” He also says: “We have to take these pills every day.” The video was later taken offline.

Other children also told their parents they were fed “white pills” at school. The young pupils said the pills were “not bitter.”

The accusations against the kindergarten made headlines in China on Wednesday and Thursday, but many news reports were pulled offline shortly afterward.

Discussions on social media are also censored. The hashtag “Beijing’s RYB Centre Suspected of Child Abuse’ (#北京红黄蓝涉嫌虐童#) became of the top ten topics on Weibo on Thursday afternoon, but then became inaccessible.

A Beijing Youth Daily journalist reported that on Thursday, November 23, a group of parents gathered at the gate of the kindergarten where a meeting would supposedly be held at the time of writing. Parents demanded to see the center’s surveillance videos, but according to reports that came out around 17.30 Beijing time, the police had already confiscated the footage.

Parents gather at the school gates.

Police in Chaoyang district are currently investigating the parents’ claims that their children were drugged and abused. Three employees of the company have been temporarily suspended from their duties, a company spokesman stated to reporters on Thursday late afternoon outside the kindergarten.

Netizen’s photos show a swarm of reporters and parents outside the kindergarten on Thursday late afternoon.

A mother’s tearful account to reporters.

Several emotional parents spoke to reporters outside the school gates. One mother told reporters that her child had disclosed that teachers had threatened the children not to tell their parents about things occurring at the preschool. They told the young children that they had a “very long telescope” and would be able to watch them, even if they were at home.

“My child is only three-and-a-half years old, and I found needle hole marks on his thighs and buttocks. I am trembling with anger,” one other parent told reporters.

In an interview with another parent, a mother tells about her 3-year-old child’s account of all the children being subjected to naked “health checks” at school by a “grandpa doctor” and “uncle doctor,” who also did not wear any clothes according to the child. Children were allegedly forced to watch one of the pupils being raped (being described as a “piston motion” [活塞运动]) by the “uncle doctor.”

A father stated to journalists that one of the children had been taken to the hospital on November 22 for an examination, and that the doctor found there was trauma to the anus area. “I feel like burning down the school,” the man said.

Also read:
UPDATE: Press Release November 28
Collective Shock after Exposure of RYB Education Children’s Abuse
WeChat Essay: “The RYB Kindergarten ‘Piston Action’ Child Abuse Case” (Translation)

By Manya Koetse and Miranda Barnes

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2017 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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Stories that are authored by the What's on Weibo Team are the stories that multiple authors contributed to. Please check the names at the end of the articles to see who the authors are.

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8 Comments

  1. Pingback: Beijing’s RYB Education Branch Accused of Drugging and Molesting Children – World is Crazy

  2. Pingback: Beijing Kindergarten Engulfed in Accusations of Abuse | C cLear World

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  4. Pingback: Beijing Kindergarten Engulfed in Accusations of Abuse - B Code

  5. kim

    November 24, 2017 at 9:59 pm

    what a shame of my country!but!i hope you guys report this news to let more and more people to know this shit,because the RYB Education is on the NYSE,I hope its share price continues to plummet.

  6. Pingback: Chinese authorities: Don’t Report or Comment on Beijing Kindergarten Abuse | HackerWorld

  7. Pingback: Kisgyerekeket drogoztak be és erőszakoltak egy pekingi luxusóvodában | hamishirek.hu

  8. Pingback: Please Give Back Children a Pure World – What the World Says

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China Environment

“Dreaming of Warmth” – China’s Anti-Coal Measures Leave Villagers out in the Cold

While coal heating is being banned, many villagers are left in the cold as they have no access to electric or gas heating systems.

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Chinese authorities are on a crusade against the burning of low-quality coal in the north of China this winter. The switch from coal to natural gas in the northern regions is meant to reduce air pollution. But for those with no access to gas or electric heating, the measures mean that they are left in the cold while temperatures are dropping.

Recent measures by the Chinese government that limit coal burning in the winter in northern China, while encouraging the use of natural gas, are aimed at improving the country’s air quality.

But as many people – mainly villagers and migrant workers – in China’s northern provinces such as Shanxi or Hebei still depend on coal for their residential heating, and with natural gas resources both scarce and increasingly costly, some households or schools simply have no option but to endure the cold.

 

“This is a predicament that northerners have not encountered before: people are prohibited to burn coal, but natural gas is expensive and scarce.”

 

On WeChat, an article about the situation by ‘Brother News’ (新闻哥), a well-read news blog, has been widely shared since December 6. The article was pulled offline on Thursday.

It’s December and winter is here. But the heating, that is often envied by many people in the South, has not arrived as scheduled. In Shaanxi, Shanxi, Hebei, and other regions in the North, people are caught in cold circumstances as they are unable to warm up [their houses].

This is a predicament that the northerners have not encountered before: people are prohibited to burn coal, while natural gas is expensive and often limited, which means that they cannot use it – even if they want to. Some people complain that they can’t sleep at night because of the freezing cold, while here in Beijing, some hundred kilometers away, my problem is that I can’t sleep at night because the central heating is too hot.”

The real situation at hand, which I learned about from dozens of readers, is really heartwrenching.”

In the article, ‘Brother News’ reports about a small kindergarten and primary school in a village in Shanxi where the use of coal heating is no longer allowed this winter – the coal heating systems were already demolished last summer. But the building, that only has three classrooms, cannot be supplied with gas heating. The use of electric heating is also impossible, as it trips off the electricity.

In order to stay warm, the school can only burn wood alcohol (methyl alcohol) as a last resort. “But that costs us about 400 to 600 dollars a day [3000-4000 yuan],” one of the kindergarten teachers said.

 

“I long for blue skies and smog-free air, but if it means that so many people have to freeze out there, I don’t want it.”

 

Teachers have started to take their children outside during school time, as it is warmer there than inside the building when the sun is out. But as the temperatures are dropping below 1 degree celsius, the situation is getting more difficult – especially for the teachers and the older children who also live in the on-campus dorm rooms.

For people who do have access to natural gas heating, the costs are often too high. If a household would be heated 24 hours a day, the minimal costs are 60-70 yuan (±9-10$) per day. Considering the monthly and seasonal costs for heating, people would have to spend thousands on heating, something which is simply unattainable for many ordinary people with a moderate monthly income.

On Weibo, one news account based in Binzhou (Shandong), writes that gas boilers have already been installed in some parts of the town, but that there is no gas yet. “And we also cannot burn coal, so now we just have to endure the cold.”

The ‘Brother News’ article concludes that people do want to support the transition from coal to gas that will reduce air pollution, but that it is difficult to support these measures when there are people suffering from the freezing cold: “I long for blue skies and smog-free air,” he writes: “But if it means that so many people have to sacrifice their warmth and freeze out there, I don’t want it.”

“I also don’t hope,” the article says: “that we have to rely on our dreams to keep ourselves warm.”

 

“Same thing, different era.”

 

Authorities have now responded to the freezing predicament facing many households and public buildings in northern China by allowing the use of coal to those who have no access to electric or gas heating.

In an “urgent notice” (“特急件”) the environment ministry said that “villages that have not converted to gas may still use coal for heating, or other substitute fuels,” as reported by Financial Times. The ministry also called for a “stable gas supply” to areas in the northern regions that had already converted to gas.

Image of coal stove shared on Weibo, text says: “Coal stoves are about to become history!”

Many people on Weibo are skeptical about the notice. “What about the coal furnaces that have already been taken away,” one person asks on Weibo: “Will they be brought back? (..) And what about the people who have already been freezing cold for a month, how can they be compensated?”

Other people also wonder about all the coal heating systems that have already been removed from homes and buildings, asking if people should now install new ones to keep themselves warm this winter.

There are more people on Weibo who criticize the anti-coal measures, comparing it to measures taken by the Chinese regime from 1958 to 1962. One netizen from Shanxi writes: “Isn’t this just like the people’s communes during the Great Leap Forward? In those days the pots and pans of people were smashed, and they were told to have their meals in the communes where they went hungry. Now you no longer allow farmers to have their coal furnaces and tell them to use gas while the installations are not properly set up, letting them freeze. It’s the same thing, it’s just a different era.”

There are also those who just care about the temperature in their room: “I have been without heating for five days. It 10 degrees [celsium] in my house. I’m slowly starting to freeze out here.”

For many, the urgent notice has not brought the warmth back yet. “The only way to keep myself warm is by trembling,” one netizen writes.

By Manya Koetse and Miranda Barnes

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2017 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Digital

China’s Central Commission for Discipline Inspection’s New Online Campaign: “Anti-Corruption” Gifs & Video

China’s Central Commission for Discipline Inspection is propagating old ideas in new ways.

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Five years after launching its “Eight-point Regulation,” the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection (CCDI) turns to Weibo and WeChat to propagate its core values amongst Chinese netizens.

China’s Central Commission for Discipline Inspection (CCDI/中纪委), the highest internal-control institution of the Communist Party of China that enforces internal regulations and combats corruption and wrongdoings in the Party, has been remarkably active on social media this week.

Not only did the CCDI issue a set of 16 GIF images for netizens to use; they also launched a new public ad campaign reiterating their “Eight-point Regulation” (八项规定), a set of regulations aimed at instilling more discipline among Party members.

The rules were issued on December 4th, 2012, and relate to how Party members “should improve their work style in eight aspects, focusing on rejecting extravagance and reducing bureaucratic visits, meetings and empty talk,” according to Xinhua (2012).

 
8 Rules, 16 Gifs
 

On December 3rd, the CCDI issued its set of 16 gifs. The images, that are meant to share as downloadable ‘stickers’ on WeChat, are all themed around regulations to fight corruption and malfeasance in the Party.

The images warn against things such as the private use of cars meant for official business, or using public money for festive dinners and drinking.

The WeChat stickers became a hot topic on Chinese social media this weekend, although many netizens did not necessarily appreciate the latest addition to the wide collection of WeChat gifs.

“You can use them among your 80 million [Party members], the commoners have no use for them!”, some wrote. “What are the normal people supposed to do with them?” others wondered. Many comments on the stickers were soon taken offline.

 
“No Need to Spend Your Free Nights at Social Parties”
 

The CCDI is increasingly using digital media to communicate its core values to a large online audience. On Monday, Chinese state media also shared a short public ad campaign video by the CCDI.

It reflects on how the “Eight-point Regulation” have “changed people’s lives.”

The introduction text says:

You do not have to spend your after work hours on social events – coming home after drinking alcohol to find your child and wife fast asleep, leaving nobody to talk to. You do not have to spend you half-monthly wages on gifts to people who you barely even know. You do not have to surrender to the unwritten rules. In five years, the eight provisions have changed China – changing the lives of you and me.”

The voice-over in the video suggests that people now have more time to read books, work out, and spend time with family. The campaign’s main message is: “You can, but you don’t have to.”

Although the video was praised by some, there were also many who said its message might fall on deaf ears: “These ‘unwritten rules’ are not about Chinese bureaucracy, they are about Chinese culture,” some pointed out. “If you don’t give presents, you won’t succeed.”

 
Propaganda 3.0
 

Over the past few years, Chinese authorities are increasingly using social media as an important channel to share propaganda. This is often done in creative ways.

Information about important events and state visits of Chinese president Xi Jinping, for example, is often propagated online by means of a gif or short animated film, with Xi as a cartoon figure.

‘Cartoon commentary’ from China Daily 2016: Xi’s Europe-Asia Tour.

Both the One Belt, One Road initiative and the 19th Party Congress saw many gifs, cartoon, videos, rap songs, and even online mobile games that conveyed the government’s main message on core Party aims and values.

With the Chinese online population growing every day, and a great majority of this online population using WeChat and Weibo for daily communication and news-checking, social media have become an effective channel for propaganda in China today.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2017 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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What’s on Weibo provides social, cultural & historical insights into an ever-changing China. What’s on Weibo sheds light on China’s digital media landscape and brings the story behind the hashtag. This independent news site is managed by sinologist Manya Koetse. Contact info@whatsonweibo.com. ©2014-2017

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