Connect with us
nordvpn

China Insight

Another Kindergarten Abuse Case: Beijing’s RYB Education Branch Accused of Drugging and Molesting Children

Parents are accusing RYB Education of drugging and abusing their children. Details surrounding the case are being censored in Chinese media and on Weibo.

Published

on

After the Ctrip kindergarten scandal, another major kindergarten abuse case is the talk of the day on Chinese social media. Employees of Beijing RYB Education are suspected of drugging and molesting young children.

Another kindergarten child abuse case has sparked indignation on social media in China this week. After the Shanghai wasabi case, it now concerns the Honghuanglan (红黄蓝) kindergarten in Beijing’s Chaoyang district (Xintiandi branch).

The kindergarten, also known as the ‘Red Yellow Blue (RYB) Education’ is a large chain of preschools (2-6 year olds) with hundreds of branches across mainland China. According to China Daily, it operates 80 kindergartens directly and has 175 franchises in 130 cities and towns.

The ‘Red Yellow Blue’ kindergarten (photo by Sina).

On November 22, the story became trending on Weibo and WeChat when netizens exposed how more than a dozen parents filed a report at the Chaoyang police station against their children’s kindergarten.

The parents claim their children were fed unclear white pills and had been injected, providing many photos showing needle punctures in their children’s skin in areas on their legs, arms, and buttocks. They suspect that their children have been drugged and molested.

The case began when several parents noticed irregular behavior in their children and then discovered the punctures in their skin. Some parents claim they also found indications of sexual abuse on their child’s body. Some children refused to go to school, others pointed out where they had suffered needle pricks.

Parents shared photos showing punctures in their children’s skin.

Several videos recorded by the parents involved made their ways to parental support groups. One video shows two parents asking their toddler son about a white pill they discovered on him. The little boy then answers “the teacher gave it to me to make me sleep.” He also says: “We have to take these pills every day.” The video was later taken offline.

Other children also told their parents they were fed “white pills” at school. The young pupils said the pills were “not bitter.”

The accusations against the kindergarten made headlines in China on Wednesday and Thursday, but many news reports were pulled offline shortly afterward.

Discussions on social media are also censored. The hashtag “Beijing’s RYB Centre Suspected of Child Abuse’ (#北京红黄蓝涉嫌虐童#) became of the top ten topics on Weibo on Thursday afternoon, but then became inaccessible.

A Beijing Youth Daily journalist reported that on Thursday, November 23, a group of parents gathered at the gate of the kindergarten where a meeting would supposedly be held at the time of writing. Parents demanded to see the center’s surveillance videos, but according to reports that came out around 17.30 Beijing time, the police had already confiscated the footage.

Parents gather at the school gates.

Police in Chaoyang district are currently investigating the parents’ claims that their children were drugged and abused. Three employees of the company have been temporarily suspended from their duties, a company spokesman stated to reporters on Thursday late afternoon outside the kindergarten.

Netizen’s photos show a swarm of reporters and parents outside the kindergarten on Thursday late afternoon.

A mother’s tearful account to reporters.

Several emotional parents spoke to reporters outside the school gates. One mother told reporters that her child had disclosed that teachers had threatened the children not to tell their parents about things occurring at the preschool. They told the young children that they had a “very long telescope” and would be able to watch them, even if they were at home.

“My child is only three-and-a-half years old, and I found needle hole marks on his thighs and buttocks. I am trembling with anger,” one other parent told reporters.

In an interview with another parent, a mother tells about her 3-year-old child’s account of all the children being subjected to naked “health checks” at school by a “grandpa doctor” and “uncle doctor,” who also did not wear any clothes according to the child. Children were allegedly forced to watch one of the pupils being raped (being described as a “piston motion” [活塞运动]) by the “uncle doctor.”

A father stated to journalists that one of the children had been taken to the hospital on November 22 for an examination, and that the doctor found there was trauma to the anus area. “I feel like burning down the school,” the man said.

Also read:
UPDATE: Press Release November 28
Collective Shock after Exposure of RYB Education Children’s Abuse
WeChat Essay: “The RYB Kindergarten ‘Piston Action’ Child Abuse Case” (Translation)

By Manya Koetse and Miranda Barnes

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2017 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

print

Stories that are authored by the What's on Weibo Team are the stories that multiple authors contributed to. Please check the names at the end of the articles to see who the authors are.

Advertisement
9 Comments

9 Comments

  1. Pingback: Beijing’s RYB Education Branch Accused of Drugging and Molesting Children – World is Crazy

  2. Pingback: Beijing Kindergarten Engulfed in Accusations of Abuse | C cLear World

  3. Pingback: Beijing Kindergarten Engulfed in Accusations of Abuse - MotorSport

  4. Pingback: Beijing Kindergarten Engulfed in Accusations of Abuse - B Code

  5. kim

    November 24, 2017 at 9:59 pm

    what a shame of my country!but!i hope you guys report this news to let more and more people to know this shit,because the RYB Education is on the NYSE,I hope its share price continues to plummet.

  6. Pingback: Chinese authorities: Don’t Report or Comment on Beijing Kindergarten Abuse | HackerWorld

  7. Pingback: Kisgyerekeket drogoztak be és erőszakoltak egy pekingi luxusóvodában | hamishirek.hu

  8. Pingback: Please Give Back Children a Pure World – What the World Says

  9. LastJerrell

    January 16, 2018 at 2:06 am

    I have noticed you don’t monetize your page, don’t waste your traffic, you can earn additional bucks every month because
    you’ve got hi quality content. If you want to know
    how to make extra $$$, search for: Mertiso’s tips best adsense alternative

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

China Insight

Chinese State Media Launch ‘Hold Your Mother’s Hand’ Campaign with Xi Jinping at Forefront

“Go back home often and hold your mother’s hand, as Xi Jinping does too.”

Published

on

With the online ‘hold your mother’s hand’ campaign, various Chinese state media stress the idea of ‘homecoming’ and the importance of family ties. President Xi Jinping is represented as the perfect ‘family man’ leader.

During the Lunar New Year Holiday, the ‘coming home’ theme is always an important one on Chinese social media. For many people, the Spring Festival is the only time of the year to reunite with their families, something which is annually highlighted by media and social media users.

This year, however, it seems that Chinese state media outlets such as People’s Daily, China Daily, and CCTV have a special focus on the ‘homecoming’ theme. Besides subjects such as ‘China’s new era’, the Belt & Road Initiative, and the 40th anniversary of China’s Reform and Opening-up policy, the idea of people ‘coming home’ and being home in China was an important subject woven throughout the 2018 CCTV New Year Gala last Thursday.

The New Year Gala, that is China’s biggest live televised event, is produced by the CCTV and is an important opportunity for Chinese authorities to propagate political ideas and concepts.

This time, the show featured a comical sketch about a Taiwanese couple in the PRC, which was literally called ‘homecoming’ (回家). A special part of the show featured the ‘homecoming’ of a ‘national treasure’ painting to the Palace Museum. A public service ad broadcasted during the show also stressed the idea that there is ‘no place like home.’

Comical skit during the 2018 Gala focused on ‘homecoming’.

But the ‘homecoming’ idea is also propagated beyond the Gala, as various online campaigns are now themed around ‘homecoming’ and family ties. One of them, featuring an image of Xi Jinping and his mother, was published by various official state media Weibo accounts.

“How long has it been since you spoke to your mum?”

On February 19, People’s Daily started its “Hold Mother’s Hand” (#牵妈妈的手#) social media campaign by posting a video about urban white-collar workers who are “too busy” to visit their mother.

The video first shows images of people at working, going into meetings, and sleeping at their desk. The voiceover says: “You want a stable job. You want to succeed in life. Be acknowledged by others. You want to stay ahead of others, or at least, you don’t wanna fall behind. You want a better future than the hard times in the present. You’re busy, super busy. (..)”

The video then shifts to images of several older women, waiting by the phone, or sitting at the kitchen table. “How long has it been since you spoke to your mother about what’s on your mind?” the voiceover asks: “How long has it been since you had a taste of your mother’s cooking? Or since you went together on a walk? How long has it been since you held her hand?”

Then we see a woman at her desk, scrolling through her phone and looking at a picture of Xi Jinping walking hand in hand with his mother, with a Tang poem depicted beside it and read aloud by Xi (“慈母手中線,遊子身上衣”). The first part of the poem loosely translates as “The threads coming from a caring mother’s hand, are in the clothes of a traveling son.”

The smiles appear on people’s faces when they pick up the phone to call their mother and then go to visit her. “Go home for Spring Festival. Give your mum a hug, give yourself some warmth,” the final slogan says.

‘Daddy Xi’ as the “People’s Leader”

The campaign video was promoted online through the “Hold Your Mum’s Hand” hashtag #牵妈妈的手#, which had received 500 million views on Weibo by Monday night.

The photo of President Xi Jinping holding the hand of his mother, Qi Xin, was used in the campaign ‘profile’ photo. This image reiterates the idea of Xi as the ‘People’s Leader’ (“人民领袖”), an idea that was recently also propagated through another video by People’s Daily and CCTV, as described by Sinocism editor-in-chief Bill Bishop in “The People’s “Leader” Xi Jinping Gets A New Propaganda Title.”

New York Times reporter Chris Buckley (@ChuBailiang) noted that the new propaganda about Xi Jinping promotes the term “family-state realm” (家国天下), with Xi as the “father of the nation.”

President Xi Jinping is also nicknamed “Xi Dada” or “Big Daddy Xi” because of his approachable and friendly image (although that moniker was banned from Chinese media in 2016).

Strong nation built on strong family ties

It is not the first time that ‘homecoming’ and taking care of one’s parents is an important subject in state media propaganda; not just for the sake of promoting the image of China as a strong nation built on strong family ties, but also to actually encourage children to look after their parents.

China faces an aging population, and because of the One-Child Policy and the huge migration from rural to urban areas, there is a problem in providing sufficient care for China’s senior citizens. It is one of the reasons why children are spurred to visit their parents often – it was even stipulated in a 2013 law.

“Now People’s Daily is also encouraging us to show filial piety,” one commenter wrote.

But there are also people who were seemingly affected by the campaign: “My mum is the best mother in the world. She’s invested so much in me. Now I feel so guilty,” one netizen said.

“I’m happy I could go home and see my parent’s this Chinese New Year,” another person commented below the video: “Their hair has turned white, but we get along better now – our bond is stronger than before.”

There are also commenters, however, who have different – more practical -concerns on the issue: “My mum doesn’t like holding my hand. She thinks it’s too mushy and says it feels like she’s holding a rat.”

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Continue Reading

China Arts & Entertainment

CCTV Spring Festival Gala 2018 (Live Blog)

It’s time for the CCTV 2018 New Year’s Gala – follow the highlights and the low points here.

Published

on

It is time for the CCTV Spring Festival Gala, one of the most-watched, most-discussed, and most mocked lived television events in the world, taking place on the Lunar New Year’s Eve. What’s on Weibo discusses the ins & outs of the 2018 edition and the social media frenzy surrounding it in this live blog.

The biggest live televised event in the world, the CCTV New Year’s Gala, also known as the Spring Festival Gala or Chunwan (春晚), is a true social media spectacle. On February 15th 2018, the 36th edition of the 4-hour-long live production is taking place.

The show, that is organized and produced by the state-run CCTV since 1983, is not just a way for millions of viewers to celebrate the Lunar New Year (除夕); it is also an important opportunity for the Communist Party to communicate official ideology to the people and to showcase the nation’s top performers.

Watch the live stream here on What’s on Weibo (if you have no access to YouTube, please check the CCTV live stream here).

What’s on Weibo provides you with the ins & outs of the 2018 Gala and its social media frenzy, with updates before, during and after the show. Follow our liveblog below (we recommend you keep your browser open – you’ll hear a ‘beep’ when updated). (Note: this live blog is now closed, thank you!).

By Manya Koetse, with contributions via WeChat from Boyu Xiao, Diandian Guo, and Tim Peng

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

If you enjoy What’s on Weibo and support the way we report the latest trends in China, we would appreciate your donation. It does not need to be much; we can use every penny to help pay for the upkeep, maintenance, and betterment of this site. See this page for more information.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Follow on Twitter

Advertisement

About

What’s on Weibo provides social, cultural & historical insights into an ever-changing China. What’s on Weibo sheds light on China’s digital media landscape and brings the story behind the hashtag. This independent news site is managed by sinologist Manya Koetse. Contact info@whatsonweibo.com. ©2014-2017

Contribute

Got any tips? Or want to become a contributor? Email us as at info@whatsonweibo.com.
Advertisement