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“No Place Like Italy Innit” – Young Beckham’s Instagram Post Sparks Controversy on Weibo

Much ado about nothing? This Instagram post by Beckham has angered Chinese netizens.

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A social media post by the young Beckham son commenting on the many Asian tourists in Italy this week did not go down well on Weibo today.

Brooklyn Beckham, the 19-year-old son of celebrity couple David and Victoria Beckham, has triggered controversy on Weibo today for posting photos of Chinese or Asian tourists in Italy.

The young Beckham posted several photos of Asian tourists on his Instagram account, where he has 11,5 million followers, simply writing: “No place like Italy innit” as a caption.

Popular Weibo gossip account Bage Zhuanyong (@ba哥专用), 7+ million fans, published screenshots of the post on Weibo, writing:

Brooklyn, the Beckhams’ young son, has photographed Chinese tourists in Italy without their permission, writing: ‘This simply isn’t Italy anymore [这里简直不像意大利].’ It has been the PRC National Day [holiday] recently, with many people going abroad to travel. As a result, Brooklyn has even secretly photographed Chinese tourists in the supermarket. In the comments below, many people also demand that he should show some tolerance and explain himself, and shouldn’t secretly photograph people and use such a disgusted tone.”

The Weibo post on Beckham was reposted more than 3000 times today, attracting some angry comments about him ‘secretly’ photographing Chinese tourists and seemingly sounding discriminatory against Chinese. Similar sentiments could be found under Brooklyn’s post.

Other Weibo posts about Beckham also attracted thousands of comments on the platform today, and several Chinese media also covered the ‘incident’.

“He has no inner quality,” some said: “He is nothing without his dad.”

“Before he starts discriminating other people, he’d better finish college first,” others wrote.

“He himself is in Italy too, and he’s no Italian, innit?” others wrote.

“We welcomed the Beckhams to China to come and make money here,” one Weibo user said.

On Weibo, David Beckham has his own official account, where he has over six million fans who nicknamed him ‘Little Beck’ (小贝). The footballer was previously assigned as a global ambassador for Chinese football.

Many netizens also left messages on David Beckham’s account, telling him not to bring his son to China.

The comment that the young Beckham would be a ‘baizuo’, a Chinese derogatory term refer to Western leftist liberal elites, is also a recurring one. “If I see women with headscarves in Germany everywhere, I’d also say that it doesn’t look like Germany to me,” some say, writing that Beckham would not dare to say anything about immigrants in Europe, but apparently not finding it problematic to comment on the ubiquity of Asian tourists.

But amidst all criticism, there were also voices encouraging others to show some more tolerance themselves, saying: During the National Holiday, the crowds are flocking to Beijing, or Shanghai, and we also say ‘This doesn’t look like Shanghai anymore’, there’s nothing wrong with that.”

By Miranda Barnes & Manya Koetse

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©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Avatar

    youstinkofwhitepoop

    October 6, 2018 at 5:48 am

    your own fault for idolising white people and following them on IG. Instagram serves no purpose except for attention seekers looking for followers or trying to be KOL. if you have an IG account, you must be a retarded follower idioiser or an attention seeking tit looking for followers.

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    Catherine Procter

    October 18, 2018 at 9:36 pm

    Chinese people should stop having beckham represent them. Always knew this family thinks they are far superior than anyone else. I’ve always had my suspicion that they laugh at the Chinese, but don’t mind taking their money cause it maintains their lifestyle and bow legged Brookie boy can lord it over everyone else.

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China Arts & Entertainment

‘First Lady of Hong Kong TV’ Lily Leung Passes Away at Age 90

Chinese netizens pay their respects to veteran actress Lily Leung Shun-Yin (1929-2019), who passed away on August 13.

Manya Koetse

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Lily in 1996, image via Sing Tao Daily.

While the Hong Kong protests are dominating the headlines, the death of Hong Kong veteran actress Lily Leung Shun-Yin (梁舜燕) has become a top trending topic on social media site Sina Weibo under the hashtag “Hong Kong Actress Liang Shunyan Dies from Illness” (#香港演员梁舜燕病逝#).

Lily Leung, image via http://www.sohu.com/a/333418087_161795.

The actress was born in Hong Kong in 1929. She starred in dozens of television series, including the first TV drama to be locally broadcasted. She became known as “the first lady of Hong Kong TV.”

Leung acted for TVB and other broadcasters. Some of her more well-known roles were those in Kindred Spirit (真情) and Heart of Greed (溏心风暴).

Leung, also nicknamed ‘Sister Lily’ (Lily姐), passed away on August 13. According to various Chinese media reports, the actress passed peacefully surrounded by family after enduring illness. She was 90 years old.

“I’ve seen so much of her work,” many Weibo netizens say, sharing the favorite roles played by Leung. “I always watched her on TVB while growing up, and will cherish her memory,” one commenter wrote.

Another well-known Hong Kong actress, Teresa Ha Ping (夏萍), also passed away this month. She was 81 years old when she died. Her passing away also attracted a lot of attention on Chinese social media (
#演员夏萍去世#).

Many people express their sadness over the fact that not one but two grand ladies from Hong Kong’s 20th-century entertainment era have passed away this month.

“Those people from our memories pass away one by one, and it represents the passing of an era,” one Weibo user wrote.

“Two familiar faces and old troupers of Hong Kong drama – I hope they rest in peace.”

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. Please note that your comment below will need to be manually approved if you’re a first-time poster here.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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China Celebs

Iconic Shanghai Singer Yao Lee Passes Away at the Age of 96

Yao Li, one of the seven great singing stars of Shanghai in the 1940s, has passed away.

Manya Koetse

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Chinese singer Yao Lee (姚莉), the ‘Queen of Mandarin pop,’ passed away on July 19 at the age of 96.

The singer, with her ‘Silvery Voice,’ was known as one of the seven great singing stars (“七大歌星”) of Shanghai of the 1940s.

For those who may not know her name, you might know her music – one of her iconic songs was used in the hit movie Crazy Rich Asians.

Yao’s most famous songs include “Rose, Rose, I Love You” (玫瑰玫瑰我爱你), “Meet Again” (重逢), and “Love That I Can’t Have” (得不到的爱情).

Yao, born in Shanghai in 1922, started singing at the age of 13. Her brother Yao Min was a popular music songwriter.

When popular music was banned under Mao in the 1950s, Hong Kong became a new center of the Mandarin music industry, and Yao continued her career there.

On Weibo, the hashtag Yao Lee Passes Away (#姚莉去世#) already received more than 200 million views at time of writing.

Many Chinese netizens post candles to mourn the death of the popular singer, some call her passing “the end of an era.”

“Shanghai of those years is really where it all started,” others say.

Listen to one of Yao’s songs below:

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. Please note that your comment below will need to be manually approved if you’re a first-time poster here.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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