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China Sex & Gender

Altercation between LGBT Supporters and Guards at Beijing’s 798 Art District

A ten-second video is causing commotion on Weibo and WeChat.

Manya Koetse

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Local guards turned violent on Sunday when people wearing and giving out rainbow badges at Beijing’s trendy 798 art district were reported as holding an “illegal gathering.” The badges were meant to raise awareness for the International Day Against Homophobia.

This article was updated on Monday, May 14, 17:30 (Beijing time).

On Sunday, May 13, an altercation between people wearing rainbow badges and local guards at the Beijing 798 art district caused much commotion on Chinese social media after footage leaked online, showing at least one female being knocked to the ground.

According to sources on Weibo, there were people giving out rainbow buttons for free to celebrate International Day Against Homophobia (May 17/国际不再恐同日) before the altercation occurred, but there are no official media sources reporting on the incident at time of writing. (Update 05/14: Global Times has now reported that “security staff at Beijing’s 798 Art Zone who roughed up two women for wearing rainbow badges on their clothing have been harshly criticized by LGBT groups and other netizens on Chinese social media on Sunday.”)

Buttons in support of the LGBT community at 798 art district.

WeChat lifestyle blogger Zakki (@zakki吉吉), however, did report on the issue, saying that Weibo netizen Piao Quan Jun (@票圈君) was one of the initiators behind the idea to give out badges in support of May 17 at the 798 art park.

Via Wechat / @zakki吉吉

Other people on Weibo also posted photos of the event, which showed that besides giving out badges, Piao Quan Jun also gave out free hugs to people.

On Sunday late afternoon, police cars allegedly came to monitor the area where the people were giving out the badges, and the activity was marked as an “illegal gathering.” Local guards started to surveil the area and denied entrance to the park to those wearing rainbow badges.

The 798 art zone is a relatively large area that used to be an old factory complex, and has now turned into an artistic community area full of exposition spaces, restaurants, and shops. It previously was the main venue for the annual Beijing Queer Film Festival.

According to Zakki, things turned violent when two females and guards clashed over the rainbow badges, which is the moment of the video that is going viral.

Although the topic was discussed by many on Weibo and WeChat, articles and videos of the incident were soon taken offline.

“Today we won’t be silent,” one Weibo user wrote: “We will raise our voice for love. Although it scares us what happened today at 798, we cannot give up our right to love and be loved.”

By Sunday late night (Beijing time) the hashtag “798 Beating” (#798打人#) received more than 250,000 views. Hours later, the page and hashtag were taken offline.

“Are public security guards allowed to beat people?” a typical comment read.

“Today, for now, I won’t discuss homosexuality or LGBT, I just want to discuss why you beat someone at all. What gives you the right?”, one commenter said.

Censorship on gay-related issues and content in China has recently gained more attention on social media sites such as Weibo. Last month, Weibo administration issued a notice saying it would no longer allow “gay content” on the site, which was reversed within days after an online uproar against the ban.

This week, China broadcast of the Eurovision Contest was revoked after Chinese broadcaster Mango TV edited out rainbow flags and other gay-related footage of the semi-final on its channel.

“I have difficulties understanding why our country would prohibit homosexuality,” one Weibo user writes: “Isn’t it a normal thing? Is it because it is not in line with your family planning program?”

By Chauncey Jung and Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Avatar

    nolgbt

    May 14, 2018 at 4:46 am

    good. give the Lbgt a good beating. Chinese lgbt are western idolising degenerates. they don’t care about Chinese culture, they only care about copying western culture.

    • Avatar

      Lee

      May 14, 2018 at 10:22 am

      What a stupid uneducated comment. As if anybody would show his preference for a culture through sexual orientation ?. In this way of thinking, eating hamburgers or wearing addidas is a sign of western idolizing too. But back to reality: homosexuality was seen as normal in Chinese history. Opposition to homosexuality started in China through the Westernization efforts of the Qing dynasty. So the contrary is right: homosexuality is a part of Chinese culture, homophobia is copying western cultures and religion.

      • Avatar

        LGBTZYZxxxdsyzaaa

        May 15, 2018 at 7:43 am

        @Lee the problem is homosexuality is only interested in ugly activism and ugly visibility, and yes expressing your sexuality is no point of pride, or individual accomplishment, no contest, just exhibitionism at it’s worst, poluting the scenery with all sorts of gender bending concepts, disreputable exhibitionism, and zombie like conduct. You see the worst aspect of homosexual activism exactly from Western Cultures, and not following it in part because of the way LGBT groups conduct themselves in Western cultures, if they were something like Japan where they act honorably and cultured, then you might see better perception for homosexual visibility in the future. As from the video, I notice the woman threw the first punch and that is another ugly sight of this sort of activism, these people just do not respect the law or civility until they face the consequences, the same can be said with LGBT activism, they are just creating their own separate identity, and expect others to subvert their own culture and national identity to include the LGBT into the mainstream. This is not going to work, LGBT movement of the Western activism concept seems nothing more than a tool to destroy social cohesion within a country and community and in the end leads to no good path forward.

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China Sex & Gender

Papi Jiang Receives Online Backlash for Giving Son Her Husband’s Surname

As a role model for female empowerment, Papi Jiang should not have given her child her husband’s last name, ‘feminists’ on Weibo say.

Manya Koetse

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An independent woman such as self-made superstar Papi Jiang should not have given her child her husband’s last name, Chinese self-proclaimed feminists say. The issue became top trending on Weibo this week.

China’s favorite online comedian and Weibo superstar Papi Jiang (papi酱) has received online backlash for giving her baby her husband’s surname.

The online controversy erupted on Mother’s Day, when Papi shared a photo of her and her baby on her Weibo account, that has some 33 million followers.

The Weibo post that became unexpectedly controversial, screenshot by What’s on Weibo before post was removed.

Papi Jiang (33) recently became a mum and wished all mothers a “Happy Mother’s Day” in her post, which addressed how being a mum is one of the most tiring tasks she has ever faced in her life. The internet celebrity also posted about suffering from mastitis (inflammation of the breast) while breastfeeding.

Underneath the post, Weibo users started a discussion on Papi Jiang being a mum and why such a successful self-made woman had opted to name her baby after her husband, instead of giving him her own surname.

Dozens of disappointed fans, internet trolls, and self-proclaimed feminists accused Papi of not being an “independent woman,” and some even suggested Papi was a “married donkey” (婚驴) for “blindly following the common rules of a patriarchal society.”

Papi Jiang (real name Jiang Yilei) is a Beijing Central Academy of Drama graduate who rose to online fame in 2015/2016 with her sharp and sarcastic videos that humorously address relevant topics in Chinese society.

She has been a highly successful as a career woman; since as early as 2016, companies offer millions to get Papi Jiang to promote their brand in one of her videos.

The comedian is often seen as an online role model for female empowerment; not just because of her economic success and independence, but also because her success is not based on her looks – which generally is the case with many female online influencers in China. Proudly identifying herself as a “leftover woman” in the early days of her rise to fame, and not afraid to use vulgar language, she was a breath of fresh air in China’s ‘Big V’ culture.

Papi once said that the most important person in the life of an independent woman is herself.

The vlogger already learned that fame can be a double-edged sword back in 2016, when she was targeted by online censors for spreading “vulgar language and content.”

This week, the controversy over the surname of Papi’s child temporarily became one of the most-searched hashtags on Weibo (#papi酱孩子随父姓引争议#), and some Chinese media outlets also reported the issue.

As per China’s Marriage Law of 1980, parents can give their child either the father’s or the mother’s surname. It is relatively unusual for parents to give their newborn the mother’s name, but there has been a recent rise in the number of babies to receive their mother’s surname.

Although Papi faced backlash for supposedly not being ‘independent’ for giving her child her own family name, many of Papi Jiang’s have come to her defense today. According to some Weibo commenters, the people who are criticizing her are “braindead single feminists” or “internet trolls projecting their own unhappiness onto Papi.”

At the time of writing, Papi Jiang’s Mother Day post and the one addressing her mastitis seem to have been removed.

By now, online discussions have also shifted to address what feminism actually is – and whether or not those attacking Papi over her child’s name are feminists or not.

“Some feminists on Weibo are truly ridiculous,” another person writes: “They talk about feminism all the time, but are quick to point their finger at women, what’s that about?”

“I am a real feminist,” one commenter writes: “The core of feminism is all about giving women the freedom to choose. This also means that women have the freedom to give their child the dad’s name.”

To read more about Chinese feminism, also see:
Liberal Writer Li Jingrui Angers Chinese Feminists: “Weaklings and Warriors Are Not Defined by Gender”
Is There No Chinese Feminism?

To read more about Papi Jiang, check out these articles.

By Manya Koetse (@manyapan)
With contributions from Miranda Barnes
Follow @whatsonweibo

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2020 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Memes & Viral

IKEA China Masturbation Video Causes Consternation on Weibo

For some people, IKEA apparently feels a little too much like home.

Manya Koetse

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A video of a woman masturbating in an IKEA store in China has gone viral among Chinese social media users.

In the video, a woman is filmed while fondling herself within an IKEA store while regular customers are shopping in the background. The video is rumored to have been filmed at the store’s Guangzhou location.

In the 2-minute video that is making its rounds, the woman is first posing on an IKEA sofa – without any pants on – pleasuring herself while another person films her.

Another shot shows her masturbating on an IKEA bed with multiple customers passing by in the background, seemingly not noticing the woman’s behavior.

In a third scene, the woman continues to masturbate within one of the store’s showrooms.

Since the pornographic video has spread across Chinese social media like wildfire, IKEA China released a statement on its Weibo account on May 9th, in which it condemned the video.

The Swedish furniture company stated that it is “committed to providing home inspiration for the public” and strives to provide a “safe, comfortable, and healthy shopping experience and environment” for its customers. IKEA further writes it “firmly opposes and condemns” the video.

In 2015, a similar incident went trending on Chinese social media regarding a video of a naked girl and a man having sex in a fitting room at the Sanlitun location of Japanese clothing brand Uniqlo.

Because of the unlikely combination of a ‘sex video’ and ‘Uniqlo’, many people wondered at the time if the viral video was actually a secret marketing campaign meant to spice up the image of Uniqlo – something that was denied by the chain.

Later on, five people were arrested over the sex tape and the personal details of the woman in the video were revealed and shared by Chinese web users.

“This is the 2020 Uniqlo,” one commenter said about today’s IKEA controversy.

Although IKEA has filed a police report against the people involved in the making of the video that has now gone viral, the identities of the woman and her accomplice are not yet known or revealed at the time of writing.

Some netizens suggest the video was filmed some time ago – in the pre-COVID-19 era – since the people in the background are not wearing face masks.

The controversy has not made the IKEA brand any less popular on Chinese social media – on the contrary. On Weibo, thousands of web users have posted about the issue, with many flocking to the IKEA Weibo account to comment.

Underneath an IKEA post promoted with the brand’s slogan “Your Home, Your Way” – that now seems a bit dubious – people are leaving all sorts of comments about the video.

Although some people express anger over the woman’s vulgar behavior, there are also many people who seem to find the controversy somewhat amusing, and many others who want to know where they can find the video.

“I’m asking for a friend,” is one of the comments that is currently recurring the most in threads about the video.

By Manya Koetse (@manyapan)
With contributions from Miranda Barnes
Follow @whatsonweibo

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2020 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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